Strength into Your Seventies and Beyond

It can be challenging to achieve physical fitness even during your youth. It becomes harder for many during their elder years but it is no less crucial. With an appropriate emphasis on health, it is possible to remain robust and vital no matter what your age.

Medical Care

According to the National Council on Aging, 80% of elderly Americans are living with at least one chronic condition such as lung disease or arthritis. Proper treatment of those illnesses is essential if the elderly patients are going to enjoy quality life in their later years. Managing such care can be complex but there are programs online that can help. Sometimes the best way to access care is in facilities like senior housing denver co where seniors have independence but assistance is available when needed.

Diet

One way to combat the negative effects of aging is through proper nutrition. Eating healthy foods may become more difficult for the elderly; for example, ill-fitting dentures may make chewing fare like salad greens and other raw fruits and vegetables painful, or medications can cause loss of appetite. Extra care must be taken to ensure a good balance of nutrients but the effort will pay off with shorter bouts of illness and reduced complications when sickness or injuries do occur.

Exercise

Everyone knows there are immense benefits to exercising regularly and as the years go by it becomes more important than ever to keep moving. The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention recommend sessions of aerobic activity daily and strength training at least two days each week. Exercise doesn’t have to be strenuous to be beneficial. Walking is great for everyone; swimming is ideal for those with joint issues; tai chi and yoga are perfect for increasing strength, balance and flexibility. Maintaining a habit of moderate exercise will help the elderly avoid falls, maintain coordination and encourage healing of minor ailments. Additionally, physical health is directly linked to mental health; increased blood flow to the brain during exercise is believed to help ward off dementia.